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Results of the implementation of a pharmaceutical care programme for patients with multiple sclerosis
  1. Tomás Sánchez1,
  2. Jose Maria Tenias2,
  3. Fernando Martinez3,
  4. Miriam Heredia4,
  5. Juan Carlos Valenzuela4,
  6. Esther Navarro5,
  7. Miguel Angel Calleja6
  1. 1Hospital Pharmacy Service, Tomelloso Hospital, Tomelloso, Ciudad Real, Spain
  2. 2Research Support Unit, La Mancha-Centro Hospital, Alcázar de San Juan, Spain
  3. 3Department of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
  4. 4Hospital Pharmacy Service, La Mancha-Centro Hospital, Alcázar de San Juan, Spain
  5. 5Emergency, Virgen de Altagracia Hospital, Manzanares, Spain
  6. 6Hospital Pharmacy Service, Virgen de las Nieves Hospital, Granada, Spain
  1. Correspondence to Tomás Sánchez, Hospital Pharmacy Service, Tomelloso Hospital, Vereda de Socuellamos s/n, Tomelloso, Ciudad Real 13700, Spain; tomas.sanchez.c{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Objectives The aim of the present work was to establish a specialised pharmaceutical care programme for patients with multiple sclerosis in order to analyse its effects on patient satisfaction, the detection of drug-related problems, and the identification and resolution of negative outcomes associated with medication.

Methods This was a prospective, longitudinal study with a pre/post-exposure design regarding the pharmaceutical care programme implemented: in bimonthly visits the pharmacist identified, detected and resolved drug-related problems and negative outcomes, and also provided information about the treatment. All patients with multiple sclerosis treated with immunomodulatory drugs from 1 June to 31 December 2011 were included in the study. A Likert scale questionnaire was used before and 6 months after the implementation to assess its impact on perceived patient satisfaction.

Results In all, 32 patients (20 women and 12 men), with an age of 39.7±8.3 years were included. A total of 26 were receiving treatment with interferon β and 6 with glatiramer acetate. All items assessing the pharmacist's skills and interest in the patient along with those assessing the information received by the patient showed significant improvement (p<0.001). Overall satisfaction also improved significantly (p=0.016). Of the 13 negative outcomes associated with medication identified, 9 were resolved. Eight negative outcomes were classified as ‘non-quantitative safety problems’ and two as ‘untreated health problems’ were due to the drug-related problem ‘probability of adverse effects’. Three classified as ‘quantitative ineffectiveness’ were due to an ‘insufficiently treated health problem’.

Conclusions The implementation of a specialised pharmaceutical care programme led to a significant improvement in perceived patient satisfaction. It has also allowed for better detection of drug-related problems and identification and resolution of negative outcomes associated with medication.

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