Article Text

PDF
Studying the knowledge, attitude and practice of antibiotic misuse among Alexandria population
  1. Raghda M El-Hawy1,
  2. Mohamed I Ashmawy1,
  3. Menna M Kamal1,
  4. Hager A Khamis2,
  5. Naglaa M Abo El-Hamed3,
  6. Gehad I Eladely4,
  7. Mayar H Abdo4,
  8. Yosra Hashem1,
  9. Marwa Ramadan4,
  10. Dalia A Hamdy1
  1. 1 Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
  2. 2 Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
  3. 3 Faculty of Agriculture, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
  4. 4 Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
  1. Correspondence to Dr Dalia A Hamdy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, 1 El Khartoum Square, P.O. Box 21521, Alexandria, Egypt; dr.daliahamdy{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Aim To assess knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of antimicrobial self-medication among a convenience sample of population in Alexandria, Egypt.

Methodology A descriptive cross-sectional study using a self-administrated semi-constructed questionnaire. A convenience sample of 359 participants was studied using appropriate consent. The questionnaire had four sections: demographics, KAP, professional medical knowledge and attitude of children caregivers toward antimicrobial self-medication. The questionnaire was initially constructed in English and then translated into its final Arabic version. The Arabic version was pilot-tested and face-validated. Descriptive and quantitative analysis were performed using SPSS (V.20.0).

Results Approximately 64% (231) of the studied population used antibiotics without prescription in the past 12 months. This was significantly correlated with female gender and lack of knowledge. The main reason for self-medication was due to saving time and effort (109, 47%) followed by not preferring doctor visits (89, 39%). More than 60% of cases used amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. The main sources of antibiotics were leftovers from previously prescribed pharmaceuticals and those purchased from community pharmacies. 85 participants were young children caregivers of which 18 (21%) reported administering antibiotics to their children without consulting a physician. Out of 115 who claimed attaining medical background, only 30 (26%) managed to answer section 3 correctly with 23 of them reporting antibiotic self-medication.

Conclusion This study showed an increased tendency towards antibiotic self-medication among Alexandrian adults and children that was not significantly decreased in population with medical background. The reasons discussed within the study should be further addressed to decrease such practice.

  • Antibiotic Resistance
  • Child-Care givers attitude
  • Medical-background population knowledge
  • self-medication
  • medication inadherence
View Full Text

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.