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Adherence and preference of intravenous zoledronic acid for osteoporosis versus other bisphosphonates
  1. Maria José Fobelo Lozano1,
  2. Susana Sánchez-Fidalgo1,2
  1. 1Pharmacy Service, University Hospital Valme, Seville, Spain
  2. 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Seville, Seville, Spain
  1. Correspondence to Dr Susana Sánchez-Fidalgo, Department of Pharmacology, University Hospital Valme, Avenida de Bellavist, Seville 41012, Spain; fidalgo{at}us.es

Abstract

Objective To evaluate adherence as well as patient preference and satisfaction of once-yearly intravenous zoledronic acid versus other bisphosphonates treatments.

Methods In accordance with the PRISMA guidelines, a systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, Cochrane Library and EMBASE databases, over the date range of 2000–2016. Following the PICO (Population, Interventions, Comparator, Outcomes) elements, eligibility criteria included: (1) participants: adults over 18 with osteoporosis and adults who were at high risk of developing low bone density as a result of chronic use of glucocorticoids; (2) intervention: adherence or patient preference/satisfaction of once-yearly zoledronic acid treatment; (3) comparator: other bisphosphonates; (4) outcome: data about adherence, persistence, compliance, preference and satisfaction criteria. Specific exclusion criteria were also applied.

Results Adherence to zoledronate is only quantified in one study showing that mean proportion of days covered for zoledronic acid was greater than for ibandronate users. Three studies showed 100% of compliance to zoledronate treatment and only one study showed zoledronic acid provided the highest persistence rates. Once-yearly intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid was clearly preferred. Only one article indicated preference for schedules that were once monthly or less frequent and other preference results practically equal between once-yearly intravenous infusion or weekly oral. Although there is little evidence, adherence to osteoporosis treatment is improved with annual intravenous zoledronate regimen. Moreover, patients appear to have preference for less frequent dosing. Switching from oral to intravenous therapy, based on the opportunities offered by an integrated health management area, may allow obtaining better outcomes in adherence to osteoporosis treatment.

  • adherence
  • preference
  • satisfaction
  • osteoporosis
  • zoledronic acid
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