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Stability of repackaged dabigatran etexilate capsules in dose administration aids
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  • Published on:
    Some issues with dose administration aids/monitored dosage systems

    Monitored dosage systems (or dose administration aids) are widely used but it is important to reduce their inappropriate use by ensuring they are only issued on a case-by-case basis to address specific practical problems of medicines adherence. It should be assumed that patients can manage their medicines unless indicated otherwise. NICE guidance (1) states monitored dosage systems should be considered as an option to improve adherence on a case-by-case basis, and only if there is a specific need to overcome practical problems. This should follow a discussion with the patient to explore possible reasons for nonadherence and the options available to improve adherence, if that is their wish.
    • The inappropriate use of monitored dosage systems can make patients and carers less familiar with their medicines. Health literacy including awareness of medicines should be promoted.
    • Transferring medicines to monitored dosage systems carries the risk of human error. The stability of many medicines cannot be guaranteed outside their original packaging.
    • Patients who may benefit from monitored dosage systems include patients who have less ability to read or understand the instructions on standard medicines packaging, but who have the dexterity to use the devices and who wish to adhere to their medicines regimen.
    • Pharmacists should check compliance issues and provide a monitored dosage system only if compliance cannot be addressed by other methods a...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.