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Effect of a pharmacist-led educational intervention on clinical outcomes: a randomised controlled study in patients with hypertension, type 2 diabetes and hypercholesterolaemia
  1. Clement Delage1,2,
  2. Hélène Lelong1,3,
  3. Francoise Brion2,
  4. Jacques Blacher1,3
  1. 1Diagnosis and Therapeutic Center, Hypertension and Cardiovascular Prevention Unit, Hôtel-Dieu Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Paris, Île-de-France, France
  2. 2Université de Paris, Faculté de Pharmacie, Paris, Île-de-France, France
  3. 3Université de Paris, Faculté de Médecine, Paris, Île-de-France, France
  1. Correspondence to Dr Clement Delage, Diagnosis and Therapeutic Center, Hypertension and Cardiovascular Prevention Unit, Hôtel-Dieu Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Paris, Île-de-France, France; clement.delage{at}aphp.fr

Abstract

Objectives In recent years, hospital pharmacists have gained more importance in the clinical support of patients. However, most of the studies evaluating the impact of clinical pharmacy have only studied patients’ adherence or satisfaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the direct clinical outcomes of a pharmacist-led educational intervention in patients with chronic disease.

Methods We conducted a randomised, controlled, parallel, physician-blinded study in a day hospital and a consultation unit of a French teaching hospital over a 1-year period. Patients with hypertension, type 2 diabetes or hypercholesterolaemia who did not reach their therapeutic goals despite drug therapy were eligible. Patients in the intervention group received an intervention from a hospital pharmacist who provided patient education on pathology and drug management. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients reaching their therapeutic goals for blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin level or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level at the 3-month follow-up consultation.

Results From January to December 2015, 89 patients were included and 73 completed the study. In the intervention group, 61.7% (21/34) of the patients reached their therapeutic goals compared with 33.3% (13/39) in the control group (p=0.015). The intervention was significantly more effective in polypharmacy patients (60.0% (12/20) vs 16.7% (4/24); p=0.005), in those aged >60 years (57.9% (11/19) vs 26.1% (6/23); p=0.037) and in patients with a high education level (68.8% (11/16) vs 29.4% (5/17); p=0.024).

Conclusion A single pharmacist-led educational intervention has a clinical impact, doubling the proportion of patients reaching their therapeutic goals at 3 months, especially in polypharmacy patients and those aged >60 years. This study confirms the value of clinical involvement of hospital pharmacists in patient care in a consultation unit and day hospital.

  • clinical pharmacy
  • education
  • pharmacy
  • pharmacy service
  • hospital
  • hypertension
  • education
  • pharmacy
  • continuing

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. Data available on request due to privacy/ethical restrictions.

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Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. Data available on request due to privacy/ethical restrictions.

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