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Implementation and effectiveness of pharmacist-led interviews at patient hospital admission in a rheumatology department
  1. Anne-Laure Yailian1,2,
  2. Laura Biry1,
  3. Aurélie Fontana3,4,
  4. Emmanuelle Vignot3,4,
  5. Charline Estublier4,5,
  6. Cyrille Confavreux4,5,
  7. Christine Pivot1,
  8. Roland Chapurlat3,4,
  9. Humbert de Freminville2,6,
  10. Audrey Janoly-Dumenil1,2
  1. 1Department of Pharmacy, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France
  2. 2EA 4129 Parcours Santé Systémique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France
  3. 3Department of Rheumatology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France
  4. 4INSERM UMR 1033, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France
  5. 5Department of Rheumatology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France
  6. 6Department of General Medicine, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France
  1. Correspondence to Dr Anne-Laure Yailian, Department of Pharmacy, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France; anne-laure.yailian{at}chu-lyon.fr

Abstract

Objectives Medication reconciliation is time-consuming and its complete deployment can be difficult. The implementation of a simplified process, such as patient interviews at admission without full reconciliation, may contribute to improve patient care. The objective of the present study was to describe the feasibility and assess the potential effectiveness of implementing pharmacist-led interviews at patient admission to a rheumatology department.

Methods This is a prospective observational study of pharmacist-led interviews at patient admission conducted between April 2015 and May 2017 in the 34-bed rheumatology department of Edouard Herriot Hospital, a French university hospital. These interviews were structured to explore patient medication management at home. The main outcome was the number of medication errors at admission. Other outcomes were the total number of interviews, the number of interviews with at least one new item of information provided by the patient, the number of interviews with at least one medication error detected, and the number of interviews leading to a modification of the hospital medication order.

Results A total of 247 interviews were carried out; there was an increase in the number of interviews over the study period (n=54 in 2015, n=98 in 2016, and n=95 for the first 5 months of 2017). Among the interviews conducted, 135 (55%) provided new information concerning patient medication management and 117 medication errors were identified in hospital orders (0.47/patient). There were 76 interviews (31%) with at least one medication error; all led to a medication order modification.

Conclusions The study found that pharmacist-led interviews at patient admission were effective in detecting medication errors. They could be an alternative to a full medication reconciliation process in targeted situations. When the patient interview does not provide sufficiently robust information, full medication reconciliation may be performed.

  • rheumatology
  • drug misuse
  • pharmacy service
  • hospital
  • safety
  • medication systems
  • hospital

Data availability statement

All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as supplementary information.

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Data availability statement

All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as supplementary information.

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