Table 1

Demographic and clinical characteristics of detected cases at hospital admission

VariableMenWomenTotal sample
Cases, n (%)32 (51.6)30 (48.4)62 (100)
Age, mean (SD), years60.6 (21.2)65.1 (23.3)62.8 (22.1)
Age, n (%)
 ≥75 years10 (31.2)15 (50.0)25 (40.3)
 65–74 years7 (21.9)3 (10.0)10 (16.1)
 45–64 years8 (25.0)6 (20.0)14 (22.6)
 11–44 years7 (21.9)6 (20.0)13 (21.0)
Mode of presentation, n (%)
 Gastric ulcer bleeding9 (28.1)8 (26.7)17 (27.5)
 Non-bleeding peptic lesion events*7 (21.8)8 (26.7)15 (24.2)
 Gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding6 (18.8)4 (13.3)10 (16.1)
 Unspecified GI bleeding†4 (12.5)6 (20.0)10 (16.1)
 Duodenal ulcer bleeding6 (18.8)3 (10.0)9 (14.5)
 Oesophageal ulcer bleeding1 (3.3)1 (1.6)
Clinical manifestations, n (%)
 Anaemia‡29 (90.6)17 (56.7)§46 (74.2)
 Melaena24 (75.0)16 (53.3)40 (64.5)
 Peptic pain11 (34.4)15 (50.0)26 (41.9)
 Coffee ground vomitus/haematemesis5 (15.6)8 (26.7)13 (21.0)
Haemoglobin, mean (SD), g/dL9.7 (2.6)10.9 (2.6)10.3 (2.6)
Red blood cell count, mean (SD), ×109/L3.4 (0.9)3.9 (0.7)3.6 (0.8)
  • *Cases without symptoms of melaena and/or coffee ground vomitus/haematemesis but with evidence of ulcer injury on gastroscopy.

  • †Cases that did not undergo gastroscopy during hospitalisation or no evidence of ulcer injury detected but with symptoms of melaena and/or coffee ground vomitus/haematemesis.

  • ‡Defined as a haemoglobin level <13 g/dL in men and <12 g/dL in women.

  • §Statistically significant differences (p<0.05) between men and women.

  • GI, gastrointestinal.