Table 2

Distribution of hospital admissions for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastropathy according to the type of NSAID, daily dose, gastrointestinal risk profile and associated use of gastroprotection

Risk profile, n (n with gastroprotection)
Drug
(mg/day)
Cases,
n (%)
Mean (SD) age, yearsSelf-medication, n (%)High*Medium†Low‡
Ibuprofen
(600–1800)
28 (45.2)52.1 (24.0)13 (21.0)7 (5)5 (0)16 (1)
Celecoxib
(200)
7 (11.3)79.9 (10.3)4 (2)2 (2)1 (0)
Dexketoprofen
(25–75)
5 (8.1)63.4 (24.1)1 (1.6)4 (1)1 (1)
Diclofenac
(50–150)
5 (8.1)71.8 (15.9)1 (1.6)4 (3)1 (0)
ASA
(100)
4 (6.4)79.0 (7.7)2 (2)2 (0)
ASA
(500)
4 (6.4)62.5 (21.0)3 (4.8)1 (1)1 (1)2 (0)
Metamizole
(475–2000)
3 (4.8)74.3 (3.5)1 (1.6)3 (1)
Aceclofenac
(200)
2 (3.2)76.5 (2.1)2 (0)
Meloxicam
(15)
2 (3.2)72.0 (2.8)2 (0)
Naproxen
(1000–1100)
2 (3.2)56.5 (33.2)1 (0)1 (0)
Total sample62 (100)62.8 (22.1)19 (30.6)28 (15)13 (3)21 (2)
  • *High-risk: patients with a history of complicated ulcer, anticoagulated or with two or more other risk factors (age >60 years, severe comorbidity, Helicobacter pylori infection, history of uncomplicated ulcer and/or concomitant use with other NSAIDs, antiplatelet drugs or systemic corticosteroids).

  • †Medium risk: patients not anticoagulated, without a history of ulcer but who have some isolated risk factors.

  • ‡Low risk: patients without risk factors.

  • ASA, acetylsalicylic acid.